Category Archives: habichuelas

CAJUN SAUSAGE AND CORN SOUP (END OF BLOGGING VACATION – WELCOME AUTUMN!)SOPA DE CHORIZO Y MAIZ

And, I’m back.  You see, several weeks ago, I decided to take a couple of days off from blogging.  From that moment on, if it wasn’t one thing, it was another.  Before I knew it, it had been weeks (months, actually) since I had posted anything.  And to top it all off, I had one major case of writer’s block.  Lots of great recipes, but nothing to say about them.  And if you know me, you know I’m not usually at a loss for words.  

But today, I looked out the window and thought, “Soup day!”  And my writer’s block was cured.  Autumn is finally here, and that means soup weather.  And for whatever reason, soup is my favorite thing to make.  I had intended to make it really great day and use the slow cooker, but I got busy doing other things and before I knew it, there wasn’t time to use the slow cooker.  So, this is a stovetop soup day.  Now, let me be perfectly honest.  When I say autumn, I mean for all you nice people north of the Mason-Dixon.  We don’t have a real autumn down here in MickeyLand, but it has been overcast today and the wind is blowing, and that, my friends, is the closest we’ll probably get to autumn.  Don’t even get me started on the subject of winter……

So, I decided to try a new soup recipe.  I had found a great recipe for Spicy Cajun Sausage and Corn Soup at Deep South Dish, so that was the plan for the day.  After it was too late to do something else, I realized I didn’t have everything, but no problem, I enjoy improvising.  The only thing is, I made so many changes that, with all due respect to Deep South Dish, this isn’t the same soup at all.  Their recipe does sound good, though, and I recommend that you check it out.  I’m still going to try it one of these days.  But, here is what turned up at our table.

CAJUN SAUSAGE AND CORN SOUP
inspired by Deep South Dish

2 tablespoons of olive oil
1 lb. Nathan’s Famous Polish beef kielbasa
1 cup of chopped onion
1/4 cup chopped green bell pepper
1 clove garlic, minced
1- 14.5 oz can diced tomatoes, undrained
1- 14.5 oz can diced chili ready tomates, undrained
1/2 tomato, chopped
1/2 teaspoon of sugar
1 can sweet corn
1 can hominy
1 can red kidney beans
4 cups of beef stock
1/4 teaspoon of salt
5  - 7 turns of the pepper grinder
1/2 teaspoon of dried basil
1 tablespoon of dried parsley
1/4 McCormick Perfect Pinch Cajun seasoning
1 bay leaf
1/2 c rice

Heat the olive oil in a large stockpot over medium heat.  Chop sausage into bite-size pieces and add to pot, cooking until slightly browned.  Add onion, bell pepper, and garlic and cook until tender.  Add the tomatoes and sugar and bring to a boil.  Add the corn, hominy, beans, and beef stock, boiling for about 5 minutes.  Add the salt, pepper, basil, parsley, Cajun seasoning, and bay leaf.  Reduce heat and simmer, covered, for 45 minutes.  

Add rice and continue to simmer about 25 minutes.   Remove bay leaf before serving.

MUSIC TO COOK BY



Until next time, Happy Cooking!  : )


Autumn is a second spring when every leaf is a flower. - Albert Camus

CONTACT ME 

TAGS:  SOUP

HABICHUELAS (PUERTO RICAN PINTO BEANS)

People like to talk about “culture clash” and the differences between ethnic groups, but if there’s one thing I’ve learned in eight years of marriage with Jorge is that people are all the same.  The girl raised in Kentucky (hey, y’all!) and the Puerto Rican born in Ohio, raised in Puerto Rico and who came to Florida via NYC should have nothing in common.  But it turns out we are more alike than different.   Now, I could wax philosophical about how love binds our hearts and builds a bridge and all that country music stuff, but that’s not what this blog is about.  it’s about food.  Plain and simple.  And that may well be the first thing I noticed.  Our food is not that different.  Note that I did not say cuisine.  Kentuckians don’t eat cuisine.  We eat dinner.  Anyway, the pork, the frying, the chicken, and the beans.  Especially the beans.  I grew up eating pinto beans all the time.  We ate them slow cooked (not Crock Pot slow-cooked, but stove top slow-cooked) flavored with a ham hock and salt.  A bowl of beans and a piece of cornbread and I’m a happy girl.  Turns out I didn’t have to give up beans, I just needed to learn to season them differently.  Now, today’s recipe uses canned beans for convenience, but if you want to use dried beans, be my guest.  I cook them the day before the Kentucky way, serve them with cornbread, and put the leftovers in the refrigerator.  The next day, they reappear in the saucepan in the recipe below.  Either way is great.  BTW, serve these with rice.  Some days I serve them with white rice, and some days I like them with Yellow Rice (Arroz Amarillo).  Whatever floats your boat!



HABICHUELAS (PUERTO RICAN PINTO BEANS)


1 tsp extra virgin olive oil
2 oz diced ham
1 can pinto beans
1 can (8 oz.) GOYA® Spanish Style Tomato Sauce
1 packet GOYA® Sazón with Coriander and Annatto 
2 Tbsp  GOYA® Recaito
3 Tbsp green olives, sliced
2 medium potatoes, peeled and cubed
2 c. College Inn® Bold Stock Rotisserie Chicken     

Heat oil to medium in deep saucepan.  Add ham.  Saute with recaito for 3 minutes.  Add tomato sauce, Sazon, and olives.  Stir; cook 2 minutes.  Add beans, potatoes, and chicken stock.  Bring mixture to boiling.  Cover with lid and reduce heat to low.  Simmer 20 minutes.



MUSIC TO COOK BY





Until next time, Happy Cooking!  : )




I know every book of mine by its smell, and I have but to put my nose between the pages to be reminded of all sorts of things.  ~George Robert Gissing

CONTACT ME 



Very Good Recipes – Kingdom of Puerto Rican Recipes

TAGS: PUERTO RICAN