Category Archives: pinto beans

LOW CARB CHILI

Recently, someone asked me if I had any low-carb recipes to post.  I knew that within this library of cookbooks I could find something, and if all else fails, old recipes can always be changed.  I’m going to try to start posting at least one low-carb recipe a week (key word: TRY).  It wouldn’t hurt us to eat a little healthier around here, so I welcome the challenge.  While I’m doing this, I’m going to look at going back to a lower fat menu as well.  Low carbs will help us lose weight, and because of my family’s coronary history, it would be nice if we slowed down on clogging the ol’ arteries. I’m not saying we’ll change our entire diet or my entire blog, but even the occasional change will help a bit.  Hopefully this new leaf will last longer than the time I tried vegetarianism.  I think I made it 24 hours. 

I found this recipe in a Weight Watchers cookbook left over from one of my good intentions a few years ago. As usual, I made a few changes.  Some were necessary because of what I had vs. what their recipe called for, and some were just because it suited me.  And I omitted the carrots (yes, I said carrots!) from their recipe because I believe that putting carrots in chili is culinary blasphemy.  If you want the carrots, feel free to put them back in.  Just don’t tell me about it.   : )

The changes I made didn’t make a huge difference in the calories/carbs/fat per serving, and I didn’t worry about the fiber, protein, sodium, or cholesterol count.  One change at a time…..

LOW CARB CHILI

adapted from “The Weight Watchers Complete Cookbook & Program Basics, 1994

Serves 4

1 Tbsp + 1 tsp extra virgin olive oil
1 c onions, diced
1/4 c green bell pepper, diced
2 cloves garlic, diced
1/4 tsp jalapeno pepper, minced, no seeds
1 Tbsp chili powder
1 tsp cumin
1 tsp oregano, dried
1 tsp Goya® Adobo con pimiento
pinch of salt
black pepper to taste
2 lean cubed steaks, chopped into small chunks
1 – 14 oz. diced tomatoes
1 – 32 oz. pinto beans
1/4 c water
1/4 c cilantro, chopped
In cast iron skillet, heat oil on medium heat.  Add onions, garlic, bell pepper, and jalapeno.  Cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally about 10 minutes.  Add seasonings and cook additional 5 minutes, continuing to stir.  Add beef, breaking up with wooden spoon while stirring.  Cook until meat is browned.  Add mixture to large saucepan.  Pour in tomatoes, beans, and water.  Bring to a boil.  Lower heat and allow to simmer 30 minutes.  Stir in cilantro and serve immediately.

 Each serving:  35g Carbohydrates

MUSIC TO COOK BY
Until next time, Happy Cooking!  : )

Take care of your body. It’s the only place you have to live. – Jim Rohn

HABICHUELAS (PUERTO RICAN PINTO BEANS)

People like to talk about “culture clash” and the differences between ethnic groups, but if there’s one thing I’ve learned in eight years of marriage with Jorge is that people are all the same.  The girl raised in Kentucky (hey, y’all!) and the Puerto Rican born in Ohio, raised in Puerto Rico and who came to Florida via NYC should have nothing in common.  But it turns out we are more alike than different.   Now, I could wax philosophical about how love binds our hearts and builds a bridge and all that country music stuff, but that’s not what this blog is about.  it’s about food.  Plain and simple.  And that may well be the first thing I noticed.  Our food is not that different.  Note that I did not say cuisine.  Kentuckians don’t eat cuisine.  We eat dinner.  Anyway, the pork, the frying, the chicken, and the beans.  Especially the beans.  I grew up eating pinto beans all the time.  We ate them slow cooked (not Crock Pot slow-cooked, but stove top slow-cooked) flavored with a ham hock and salt.  A bowl of beans and a piece of cornbread and I’m a happy girl.  Turns out I didn’t have to give up beans, I just needed to learn to season them differently.  Now, today’s recipe uses canned beans for convenience, but if you want to use dried beans, be my guest.  I cook them the day before the Kentucky way, serve them with cornbread, and put the leftovers in the refrigerator.  The next day, they reappear in the saucepan in the recipe below.  Either way is great.  BTW, serve these with rice.  Some days I serve them with white rice, and some days I like them with Yellow Rice (Arroz Amarillo).  Whatever floats your boat!



HABICHUELAS (PUERTO RICAN PINTO BEANS)


1 tsp extra virgin olive oil
2 oz diced ham
1 can pinto beans
1 can (8 oz.) GOYA® Spanish Style Tomato Sauce
1 packet GOYA® Sazón with Coriander and Annatto 
2 Tbsp  GOYA® Recaito
3 Tbsp green olives, sliced
2 medium potatoes, peeled and cubed
2 c. College Inn® Bold Stock Rotisserie Chicken     

Heat oil to medium in deep saucepan.  Add ham.  Saute with recaito for 3 minutes.  Add tomato sauce, Sazon, and olives.  Stir; cook 2 minutes.  Add beans, potatoes, and chicken stock.  Bring mixture to boiling.  Cover with lid and reduce heat to low.  Simmer 20 minutes.



MUSIC TO COOK BY





Until next time, Happy Cooking!  : )




I know every book of mine by its smell, and I have but to put my nose between the pages to be reminded of all sorts of things.  ~George Robert Gissing

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TAGS: PUERTO RICAN