Category Archives: Sazon

Chicken and Rice (Arroz con Pollo)

 

Chicken and Rice (Arroz con Pollo)
Cuisine: Puerto Rican
Serves: 4
 
Ingredients
  • 1 - 12.5 oz can Fully Cooked Chunk Chicken, drained
  • 1 Tbsp Adobo con Pimiento
  • 1 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
  • ½ packet Sazon with Achiote
  • 6 garlic cloves, mashed
  • ½ C Spanish-style tomato sauce
  • 1 green bell pepper, chopped
  • 2 Tbsp recaito
  • 8 pimento-stuffed olives
  • 1 Tbsp capers
  • 1 Tbsp onion powder
  • 2 C medium-grain rice
  • 2 C chicken stock
  • ⅓ C red roasted pepper, cut into strips
Instructions
  1. In a medium-size pot or caldero, heat EVOO.
  2. Add Sazon, Adobo, garlic, tomato sauce, green pepper, recaito, olives, capers, and onion powder.
  3. Saute over medium heat for two minutes, stirring frequently.
  4. Add chicken stock and bring to a boil.
  5. Stir in rice.
  6. Return to boiling, stirring frequently.
  7. Add chicken.
  8. Lower heat; allow rice to simmer slowly until tender.
  9. Add red pepper strips.

 

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Music to Cook By . . . 

 

Until next time, Happy Cooking!  :)

 

August, the summer’s last messenger of misery, is a hollow actor. - Henry Rollins

POLLO ASADO (ROAST CHICKEN) – and the Continuing Saga of my George Foreman Roaster

Now, if you follow me on Facebook, then you may have already read about my tragedy this week.  My George Foreman roaster died. : (  The fact that it was roasting our chicken for dinner just made it that much worse.  You have to understand my relationship with this appliance.  Next to my slow cooker(s), this was my favorite appliance.  I loved it more than my microwave, which I pretty much just use for popcorn these days.  The funny thing was that I didn’t want it in the first place. We went to buy the George Foreman grill (which I have used 3 times in 4 years) and the Roaster was a bonus for buying the grill.  We brought it home, stored it in a cabinet for probably 6 months, and then one wonderful day, I decided to give it a whirl.  Love at first use.  You can take a roasting chicken, season it the way you want, put it in the roaster, set the timer for 90 minutes, and walk away.  Who wouldn’t love that?!?  Soon after I fell in love with it, we discovered they had discontinued it.  We have perused garage sales and Goodwill stores ever since, thinking we would buy up good used ones if necessary for backup.  No luck.  So when George (the roaster, not Jorge my husband) gave a little “click” and died, I thought it was forever.  I mean, dinner went on; please people, it takes a lot of grief to get me to skip a meal!  : )  and I do know how to use the oven.  So, into the oven went the chicken and dinner went as planned.  Which is why today’s recipe is oven-roasted chicken.  But here’s the “Awww….” part of the story.  Jorge (my hubby, not George the roaster) bought me a new one on eBay!  Yay!  I knew I married him for a reason…..So, for the next few days, I will be chasing every UPS truck in the neighborhood.  

Anyway, here’s how I roast chicken in the oven:

POLLO ASADO


1 roasting chicken
1 packet GOYA® Sazon
ADOBO POLLOCHON MAGA®     


Preheat oven to 450 degrees.  Rub seasonings thoroughly over chicken.  Bake at 450 for 2 hours or until meat thermometer shows a minimum of 180 degrees.  


IMPORTANT:  You should always use a meat thermometer with chicken.  Undercooked chicken is dangerous, not to mention gross.  


I didn’t post a picture because I have no idea how to get a good picture of a roast chicken.  Jorge bought me “Plate to Pixel” by Helene Dujardin for Christmas, and I highly recommend it btw, but I still don’t know how to get a good picture of a chicken.


MUSIC TO COOK BY



Until next time, Happy Cooking!  : )


Ever consider what pets must think of us? I mean, here we come back from a grocery store with the most amazing haul – chicken, pork, half a cow. They must think we’re the greatest hunters on earth! - Anne Tyler

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HABICHUELAS (PUERTO RICAN PINTO BEANS)

People like to talk about “culture clash” and the differences between ethnic groups, but if there’s one thing I’ve learned in eight years of marriage with Jorge is that people are all the same.  The girl raised in Kentucky (hey, y’all!) and the Puerto Rican born in Ohio, raised in Puerto Rico and who came to Florida via NYC should have nothing in common.  But it turns out we are more alike than different.   Now, I could wax philosophical about how love binds our hearts and builds a bridge and all that country music stuff, but that’s not what this blog is about.  it’s about food.  Plain and simple.  And that may well be the first thing I noticed.  Our food is not that different.  Note that I did not say cuisine.  Kentuckians don’t eat cuisine.  We eat dinner.  Anyway, the pork, the frying, the chicken, and the beans.  Especially the beans.  I grew up eating pinto beans all the time.  We ate them slow cooked (not Crock Pot slow-cooked, but stove top slow-cooked) flavored with a ham hock and salt.  A bowl of beans and a piece of cornbread and I’m a happy girl.  Turns out I didn’t have to give up beans, I just needed to learn to season them differently.  Now, today’s recipe uses canned beans for convenience, but if you want to use dried beans, be my guest.  I cook them the day before the Kentucky way, serve them with cornbread, and put the leftovers in the refrigerator.  The next day, they reappear in the saucepan in the recipe below.  Either way is great.  BTW, serve these with rice.  Some days I serve them with white rice, and some days I like them with Yellow Rice (Arroz Amarillo).  Whatever floats your boat!



HABICHUELAS (PUERTO RICAN PINTO BEANS)


1 tsp extra virgin olive oil
2 oz diced ham
1 can pinto beans
1 can (8 oz.) GOYA® Spanish Style Tomato Sauce
1 packet GOYA® Sazón with Coriander and Annatto 
2 Tbsp  GOYA® Recaito
3 Tbsp green olives, sliced
2 medium potatoes, peeled and cubed
2 c. College Inn® Bold Stock Rotisserie Chicken     

Heat oil to medium in deep saucepan.  Add ham.  Saute with recaito for 3 minutes.  Add tomato sauce, Sazon, and olives.  Stir; cook 2 minutes.  Add beans, potatoes, and chicken stock.  Bring mixture to boiling.  Cover with lid and reduce heat to low.  Simmer 20 minutes.



MUSIC TO COOK BY





Until next time, Happy Cooking!  : )




I know every book of mine by its smell, and I have but to put my nose between the pages to be reminded of all sorts of things.  ~George Robert Gissing

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Very Good Recipes – Kingdom of Puerto Rican Recipes

TAGS: PUERTO RICAN

CHULETAS EMPANADAS (BREADED PORK CHOPS)

Well, it finally happened.  My love of reading has combined with my love of cooking to create a Smithsonian-size collection of cookbooks.  Our house is being overrun with cookbooks.  Not that I’m complaining.  Nothing is more fun than searching for a new recipe.  Which brings us to tonight’s dinner.  We haven’t been eating much Puerto Rican cuisine lately, so we were overdue.  I went through my Puerto Rican cookbooks last night until I found something that sounded good.  I had not tried this one before, but it was really good.  Unfortunately, no pictures.  Next time I try this one, I’ll try to remember to take pictures and post them on here.



CHULETAS EMPANADAS (BREADED PORK CHOPS)
adapted from “Puerto Rican Cuisine in America – Nuyorican and Bodega Recipes” by Oswald Rivera


 4 pork chops
10 whole black peppercorns
 4 cloves garlic, peeled
 1 Tbsp oregano
 1 tsp salt
 1/8 tsp GOYA® Adobo con Pimiento (with Pepper)
1/2 packet GOYA® Sazón with Coriander and Annatto 
2 Tbsp Extra-Virgin Olive Oil
1 tsp white vinegar
1 egg, beaten
1 1/2 c. plain bread crumbs
Vegetable oil for frying  

In a mortar, crush peppercorns, garlic, oregano, salt, Adobo, and Sazon together.  Add olive oil and vinegar; mix.  Fill deep frying pan (I use my cast iron chicken fryer, which is a deep skillet with a lid) halfway with vegetable oil.  Heat oil to medium high heat.  Rub seasoning into each side of chop.  Dip chop into beaten egg.  Coat each side of chop thoroughly with bread crumbs.  Add to frying pan and cook until golden brown (about 4-5 minutes each side) .  


MUSIC TO COOK BY





Until next time, Happy Cooking!  : )



You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality.” - Ayn Rand 

Very Good Recipes – Kingdom of Puerto Rican Recipes

TAGS: PUERTO RICAN